The former manager of the legendary hard rock band Guns N’ Roses, Doug Goldstein has reminisced about the band’s controversial period when they released their 1999 album, ‘Live Era ’87–’93,’ and unveiled details about the recording process showing who is more perfectionist among Axl Rose and Slash.

During his recent conversation on Appetite for Distortion, the ex-manager of Los Angeles-based band Guns N’ Roses, Doug Goldstein, who managed them from 1991 to 2008, has opened up about one of the most criticized albums of the band, ‘Live Era ’87–’93.’

Goldstein explained how much the recordings were embellished in the studio and who was more concerned about what the fans were going to listen to between the frontman, Axl Rose, and the lead guitarist, Slash.

The ex-manager revealed the fact that all they were doing was calling out fixes in the live album. It was the original recorded material but Slash spent most of the time re-dubbing tracks, he said while calling him a very concise guy.

Implying that Slash is more perfectionist than Rose, Goldstein said that if Slash had made any errors then he would go back and redo the tracks. On the other hand, Axl Rose did a couple of fixes in ‘Live Era ’87–’93’ but it certainly wasn’t every track, the ex-manager told.

‘Live Era ’87–’93’ is a double live album by Guns N’ Roses. It was released on November 23, 1999. The record was the first official Guns N’ Roses release since ‘The Spaghetti Incident?’ released on the same day in 1993. Guitarist Slash notes that the album is not pretty and there are a lot of mistakes.

Here’s what Doug Goldstein said about ‘Live Era ’87–’93’:

“Basically, all we were doing was calling out fixes. It was the original recorded material but Slash spent most of the time re-dubbing tracks.

And it wasn’t like Slash is the most fallible guy in the band, he just is very concise and considers what the fans are going to listen to. And so, if he had made any errors then he would go back and redo the tracks.

Axl did a couple of fixes but from what I remember it certainly wasn’t every track. And there were fixes as opposed to redoing the whole thing.

Unlike, by the way, [the 1986 live album] ‘Live ?!*@ Like a Suicide,’ where you’ve got canned audience noise which just drives me crazy.”

You can check out the rest of the conversation below.