Led Zeppelin icon Jimmy Page posted the cover of ‘Led Zeppelin I‘ album on his official Instagram account and commemorated his dear friend John Bonham by claiming he changed drumming forever with his technique on ‘Good Times Bad Times.’

As you may recall, the legendary drummer of Led Zeppelin, John Bonham, also known as Bonzo, sadly passed away on September 25, 1980, at the age of 32. After a heavy day of drinking at the rehearsals, Bonham was found unresponsive. His death was later announced to be caused by a shock from inhaling vomit with alcohol in his system.

Bonzo was widely known for the unique techniques he presented on Led Zeppelin’s iconic songs, including ‘Good Times Bad Times’ from the 1969 album ‘Led Zeppelin I.’ The band released their debut album on January 12, 1969, which was produced by the group’s founder and guitarist Jimmy Page.

Jimmy was also the one who chose the cover of ‘Led Zeppelin I,’ which featured a black-and-white image of the burning Hindenburg airship. Although the album initially received poor reviews by the press, ‘Led Zeppelin I’ reached #10 on the Billboard chart and earned its U.S. gold certification later in July 1969.

Recently, Jimmy Page posted the photo of ‘Led Zeppelin I’s cover on his Instagram account and shared the details of the recording sessions of the album. On the caption of his post, Page also remembered the iconic work of his dear friend and bandmate John Bonham particularly on the opening track of ‘Led Zeppelin I,’ ‘Good Times Bad Times.’

Jimmy mentioned the fact that with his unique techniques in ‘Good Times Bad Times,’ Bonzo actually changed drumming forever. Page mourned after the loss of his dear friend by emphasizing the heroic musical legacy he left for the next generation of rock musicians.

Here’s what Jimmy Page stated on the caption of his latest post:

“Today heralds the inception of the epic Led Zeppelin I album: the moment whereby I would be able to manifest the sounds and layers I had heard in my head and also prove my status as a producer.⁣

The group went to Studio No.1, Olympic Studios, 117 Church Road, Barnes, London, SW13, having extensively rehearsed the material for Led Zeppelin I at my house in Pangbourne and we had had the opportunity to perform a good percentage of that material during a few concerts in Scandinavia and the UK to experience our music in a live situation under the clandestine cloak of the Yardbirds.

In those days, the studio time was scattered and limited over a few days in September and October, dictated by Olympic’s availability.⁣ Thus, with the aid of my old friend Glyn John’s masterful engineering, at 11 pm on Wednesday 25th September 1968, we began our recordings and embarked upon committing this eclectic powerhouse to tape.⁣

Much has been speculated about the initial recordings, so I thought it would be useful to show the worksheet from RAK that gives the dates and times that we were scheduled initially to go in. It makes fascinating reading.

The opening track of Led Zeppelin I, Good Times Bad Times, changed drumming forever with the glorious technique of John Bonham. Sadly, this day is 40 years since his passing. He left a heroic musical legacy.”

You can see the photos Jimmy Page posted on his official Instagram account below.

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Today heralds the inception of the epic Led Zeppelin I album: the moment whereby I would be able to manifest the sounds and layers I had heard in my head and also prove my status as a producer.⁣ ⁣ The group went to Studio No.1, Olympic Studios, 117 Church Road, Barnes, London, SW13, having extensively rehearsed the material for Led Zeppelin I at my house in Pangbourne and we had had the opportunity to perform a good percentage of that material during a few concerts in Scandinavia and the UK to experience our music in a live situation under the clandestine cloak of the Yardbirds. In those days, the studio time was scattered and limited over a few days in September and October, dictated by Olympic's availability.⁣ ⁣ Thus, with the aid of my old friend Glyn John's masterful engineering, at 11pm on Wednesday 25th September 1968, we began our recordings and embarked upon committing this eclectic powerhouse to tape.⁣ ⁣ Much has been speculated about the initial recordings, so I thought it would be useful to show the worksheet from RAK that gives the dates and times that we were scheduled initially to go in. It makes fascinating reading. The opening track of Led Zeppelin I, Good Times Bad Times, changed drumming forever with the glorious technique of John Bonham. Sadly, this day is 40 years since his passing. He left a heroic musical legacy.

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