Queen’s iconic guitarist Brian May posted the photos of his unique present on Instagram which was given by his astrophotographer friend Jamie Cooper in honor of his 73rd birthday.

As you might know, Brian May is also an astrophysicist with a Ph.D. Brian has been sharing his interest in astrophysics by informing his fans about unique and important astronomical events on his Instagram account.

Last week on Instagram, Brian May celebrated his birthday with lovely birthday wishes he received from fans and friends around the world. Brian shared his gratitude for everyone who showed their support during his difficult days.

Recently, Brian May posted the photos of the unusual present he received for his 73rd birthday on Instagram. Apparently, Brian’s astrophotographer friend Jamie Cooper send him special photos of Comet NEOWISE taken on his birthday, July 19th.

On the caption of his post, Brian thanked his dear friend for his thoughtful gift and mentioned how amazing the photos of the comet. In this way, he also showed his gratitude to his long-time friend.

Here’s what Brian May wrote on the caption of his recent post:

I had to share this stereo of Comet NEOWISE, folks.  Try free-viewing it and then pinching out with two fingers to zoom in – it gets better ! Taken on 19th July, it makes a great birthday present for me from Jamie Cooper.

Jamie is a brilliant astrophotographer, and not only selected two beautiful shots taken about an hour and a half apart – time enough for the comet to move against the star background just enough to give a nice 3-D effect – but also aligned them perfectly as a stereo pair. I’ve adapted it here to IG-friendly format, to share with you guys. If anyone else has managed to pull this off for this comet, I haven’t seen it.

It’s amazing how, seen lifted off the starscape behind, every detail in the comet’s delicate structure leaps out – the curved yellowish dust tail, the blueish and almost straight gas (ion) tail, and the nucleus of the comet, surrounding the physical rock which is the rocky body itself. Here it looks like it’s on fire, caught in the brilliant sunlight, but the comet is cold as ice. Swipe for parallel stereo, cross-eyed stereo, and a mono version.

I’ve also included a different kind of stereo of the comet which caught my eye. It was cleverly put together by Jasminka who combined one of Jamie’s photos of the comet over Stonehenge with a shot from a different photographer Kester Freeman who must have been just a few yards away at that moment. This produces a hyper stereo of the rocks of Stonehenge – and the comet apparently floating in mid-air above them.

Out of curiosity, I zoomed in to this stereo to see if the comet had moved between shots. As you can see, in this case, there is no movement of the comet relative to the stars behind, so the two shots must have been taken at almost exactly the same moment! And so the comet doesn’t stand out in the stereo. But the compensation is a lovely terrestrial stereo foreground. Anybody seen any other attempts at a stereoscopic NEOWISE? I’d be interested to see. Cheers pals.

You can see the photos Brian May posted on his Instagram account below.

View this post on Instagram

I had to share this stereo of Comet NEOWISE, folks. 💥💥💥💥 Try free-viewing it and then pinching out with two fingers to zoom in – it gets better ! Taken on 19th July, it makes a great birthday present for me from Jamie Cooper. Jamie is a brilliant astrophotographer, and not only selected two beautiful shots taken about an hour and a half apart – time enough for the comet to move against the star background just enough to give a nice 3-D effect – but also aligned them perfectly as a stereo pair. I’ve adapted it here to IG-friendly format, to share with you guys. If anyone else has managed to pull this off for this comet, I haven’t seen it. It’s amazing how, seen lifted off the starscape behind, every detail in the comet’s delicate structure leaps out – the curved yellowish dust tail, the blueish and almost straight gas (ion) tail, and the nucleus of the comet, surrounding the physical rock which is the rocky body itself. Here it looks like it’s on fire, caught in the brilliant sunlight, but the comet is cold as ice. Swipe for parallel stereo, cross-eyed stereo, and a mono version. I’ve also included a different kind of stereo of the comet which caught my eye. It was cleverly put together by @stereojazz.3d who combined one of Jamie’s photos of the comet over Stonehenge with a shot from a different photographer @kesfreeman who must have been just a few yards away at that moment. This produces a hyper stereo of the rocks of Stonehenge – and the comet apparently floating in mid-air above them. Out of curiosity, I zoomed in to this stereo to see if the comet had moved between shots. As you can see, in this case there is no movement of the comet relative to the stars behind, so the two shots must have been taken at almost exactly the same moment ! And so the comet doesn’t stand out in the stereo. But the compensation is a lovely terrestrial stereo foreground. Anybody seen any other attempts at a stereoscopic NEOWISE ? I’d be interested to see. Cheers pals. Bri

A post shared by Brian Harold May (@brianmayforreal) on