The British rock and roll photographer, Ross Halfin has unveiled shocking inside news from the time he shot the short-lived heavy metal supergroup, Damnocracy, by saying he was offered to double the money if he made the photoshoot miserable for the former Skid Row frontman, Sebastian Bach.

The iconic photographer Ross Halfin, who worked for some of the biggest acts in rock and heavy metal, including Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Black Sabbath, The Who, Kiss, Metallica, and Iron Maiden, has shown up on Instagram with an old photoshoot, when he captured the members of Damnocracy, the band formed on, and for, the VH1 TV show ‘Supergroup‘ in 2006.

Halfin recalled shooting Sebastian Bach, Ted Nugent, Scott Ian, Evan Seinfeld, and Jason Bonham altogether and said that he likes and enjoys working with everyone in this group. He explained that he was made to wait in a junkyard all day with not even a bottle of water a bit like being in a mini prison, but he did get paid a lot of money by the film company.

The photographer revealed that the brief was that he had to give Sebastian a hard time but he has always liked him so didn’t feel the necessity to be unfairly harsh to him. Yet, the film company was so insistent on this thought that they offered to double the money if Halfin made the shoot miserable for Bach.

Supergroup was a 2006 reality show on VH1 that followed five well-known hard rock and heavy metal musicians over a 12-day period during which they lived together in a Las Vegas mansion owned by Nico Santucci in order to create, plan and perform a live show together.

The show, which aired in seven segments, starred band members Sebastian Bach, Jason Bonham, Scott Ian, Ted Nugent, and Evan Seinfeld. Doc McGhee, who had previously worked with Bach and his band Skid Row, appeared as the band’s manager.

Here’s what Ross Halfin said in his latest Instagram post:

“Damnocracy. Photographed in Las Vegas. I like and enjoy working with everyone in this group. I was made to wait in a junkyard all day with not even a bottle of water a bit like being in a mini prison, but I did get paid a lot of money by the film company.

The brief was that I had to give Sebastian ‘a hard time’ but I’ve always liked him so didn’t feel the necessity to be unfairly harsh to him. The film company was so insistent on this though that they offered to double the money if I made the shoot miserable for him.”

You can see the post below.